Hooters Hall

Polytunnel Update

The weather was a bit changeable this weekend so I was happy having lots of tasks to keep me busy in the polytunnel. Although the polytunnel took quite a battering from storm Doris recently, and we will have to replace the cover, it’s still functioning.

First task for the day was to get my Vitopod cuttings propagator up and running. I’ve found that using the Vitopod significantly increases my success rate, particularly with softwood cuttings. It’s a hydroponic cuttings propagator and I think the hydroponics make it very easy to maintain adequate hydration of the cuttings while they are growing new roots.

Today I took some Bay, Rosemary, Sage and Box cuttings. I also want to take try taking some cuttings from my fig trees later in the season as well as more herbs. I’ve found that taking cuttings from plants that are already thriving in the environment at Hooters Hall generally leads to more success when it comes to planting out.

Here’s a picture of my Vitopod and the first of the cuttings

 The polytunnel is full of seedlings at the moment. I’m shuffling them between the heated propagator, the hot beds and my potting table. The hot beds have been working really well. The temperature does drop a bit more than the heated propagator when it’s a cold day but overall they are keeping a temperature of around 20C. Once I’ve got all my seedlings growing well I’ll be using the hot beds to plant out my sweet peppers and in June I’ve got some sweet potato slips arriving which will also go in the hot bed. If there’s room I want to get at least some of my melon plants in their too although they did quite well just in the raised bed lat year.

Here’s some pics from around the polytunnel as you can see the Elephant Garlic in the raised bed is coming along nicely I’ve also got quite a few shallots and spring onions.

I’ve grown quite a few different varieties of tomato this year. The one that I’m most fascinated by at the moment is Tiny Tim. It’s been bred to be a true windowsill tomato and I’m planning on growing it on a shelf in our South facing conservatory. The plants are perfectly formed and thriving but miniature in comparison with the other tomatoes. Here’s a picture.

As well as miniature windowsill tomatoes I’ve also got some miniature Blueberries which seem to be doing quite well and I’m going to be growing Butterbush a variety of Butternut squash that is more bush like than vine like and which produces smaller squashes. I’m interested to see the produce from these mini varieties. So far the tomato plants are vigorous but tiny and I’m hoping we’ll have a good crop.

Last year I tried straw bale gardening for the first time with great success. I grew cabbage, kohl rabi, beans, peas and spring onions in my straw bales and also planted the same varieties in the polytunnel beds so I could compare them. Without fail the plants in the straw bales were 3 weeks or so ahead of the plants in the beds. You need to keep on top of the watering with straw bale gardening but that wasn’t a problem because we have a water supply in the polytunnel. My straw bales survived the winter and although I wouldn’t want to move them around they seem to be intact enough for another season of growing. I’ve decided to grow salad crops, shallots, spring onions and maybe some carrots in them this year.

To get the bales ready for planting I’ve spent the week watering them and adding some fertilizer to get the decomposition going again. Last year I started my vegetables in trays then planted them in the bales as plug plants. This year I’m more confident so I’m starting the seeds straight on the bales. Today I added a thin layer of compost to four of the bales and then sowed some rocket, spring onions and shallots. Here’s a picture.

My final job of the day was to plant several trays of sunflowers. I have some that have been bred as cut flowers, an edible variety and a super tall variety that I’ll be taking into my workplace for a sunflower growing competition. I’m looking forward to trying the edible variety . The buds, petals and seeds are all edible. According to the sales pitch the petals  can be added to a salad for a colour contrast and a mild nutty taste. The green buds can be blanched, then tossed in garlic butter; being similar in flavour to a Jerusalem artichoke and the kernels inside the seeds can be eaten raw or toasted as a snack.

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